A Day Out Beside The Seaside!

No. of Days

2

Transport

 

Theme

  • Walking
  • History
  • Dog friendly

Highlights and Delights

A useful description for the upcoming detailed information on day 1 an day 2 of exploring the local Angus Area

  • Day 1 - Explore the Locations

    • Location 1
    • Location 2
    • Location 3

    Location 1: Bell Rock Lighthouse 

    The Bell Rock Lighthouse, off the coast of Angus, is the world’s oldest surviving sea-washed lighthouse. It was built between 1807 and 1810 by Robert Stevenson on the Bell Rock (also known as Inchcape) in the North Sea, 11 miles (18 km) east of the Firth of Tay. Standing 35 metres (115 ft) tall, its light is visible from 35 statute miles (56 km) inland.

    The lighthouse operated in tandem with a shore station, the Bell Rock Signal Tower, built in 1813 at the mouth of Arbroath harbour. Today this building houses the Signal Tower Museum, a visitor centre detailing the history of the lighthouse.

    According to legend, the rock is called Bell Rock because of a 14th-century attempt by the Abbot of Arbroath to install a warning bell on it. The bell lasted only one year before it was stolen by a Dutch pirate. This story is immortalised in “The Inchcape Rock”, a poem by 19th-century poet Robert Southey. The rock was the scene of many shipwrecks as it lies just below the surface of the sea for all but a few hours at low tide.

    Bell Rock Lighthouse, Arbroath

    Location 2: Inchcape Marine Services

    Fishing trips off Arbroath and sightseeing trips to the cliffs, Lunan Bay and Bellrock as well as longer trips up the Tay to Perth.

    All trips subject to weather and tides.

    Inchcape Marine Services Arbroath

    Location 3: Arbroath Harbour

    Arbroath Harbour is ideally located with a number of services including 59 floating pontoon berths which are accessed by a security entrance. These berths are served with electricity and fresh water to accommodate all types of leisure craft. Half height dock gates with a walkway are located between the inner and outer harbours maintaining a minimum of 2.5 m of water in the inner harbour.

    The town of Arbroath offers a variety of social and sporting amenities to visiting crews and a number of quality pubs, restaurants, and the famous 12th century Abbey and Signal Tower Museum are located close to the harbour. The railway and bus stations are only 1 km from the harbour with direct north and south connections.

    Arbroath Harbour
  • Day 2 - Explore the Locations!

    • Location 1
    • Location 2

    Location 1: Arbroath Signal Tower Museum

    The Bell Rock Lighthouse, off the coast of Angus, is the world’s oldest surviving sea-washed lighthouse. It was built between 1807 and 1810 by Robert Stevenson on the Bell Rock (also known as Inchcape) in the North Sea, 11 miles (18 km) east of the Firth of Tay. Standing 35 metres (115 ft) tall, its light is visible from 35 statute miles (56 km) inland.

    The lighthouse operated in tandem with a shore station, the Bell Rock Signal Tower, built in 1813 at the mouth of Arbroath harbour. Today this building houses the Signal Tower Museum, a visitor centre detailing the history of the lighthouse.

    According to legend, the rock is called Bell Rock because of a 14th-century attempt by the Abbot of Arbroath to install a warning bell on it. The bell lasted only one year before it was stolen by a Dutch pirate. This story is immortalised in “The Inchcape Rock”, a poem by 19th-century poet Robert Southey. The rock was the scene of many shipwrecks as it lies just below the surface of the sea for all but a few hours at low tide.

    Arbroath Signal Tower Museum

    Location 2: Bell Rock Lighthouse 

    The Bell Rock Lighthouse, off the coast of Angus, is the world’s oldest surviving sea-washed lighthouse. It was built between 1807 and 1810 by Robert Stevenson on the Bell Rock (also known as Inchcape) in the North Sea, 11 miles (18 km) east of the Firth of Tay. Standing 35 metres (115 ft) tall, its light is visible from 35 statute miles (56 km) inland.

    The lighthouse operated in tandem with a shore station, the Bell Rock Signal Tower, built in 1813 at the mouth of Arbroath harbour. Today this building houses the Signal Tower Museum, a visitor centre detailing the history of the lighthouse.

    According to legend, the rock is called Bell Rock because of a 14th-century attempt by the Abbot of Arbroath to install a warning bell on it. The bell lasted only one year before it was stolen by a Dutch pirate. This story is immortalised in “The Inchcape Rock”, a poem by 19th-century poet Robert Southey. The rock was the scene of many shipwrecks as it lies just below the surface of the sea for all but a few hours at low tide.

    Bell Rock